Funeral Flower Guide

 

A recent article which Alison at Smallridges contributed to for the company, Headstones, Gravestones & Memorials | AK Lander

  • * No type of flower is forbidden when it comes to funerals or graves. Whilst you may consider roses, for example, to be more closely associated with romance, there is no reason why they cannot also be used in a funeral arrangement.
  • * Most florists who offer funeral-related services will be able to produce bespoke arrangements which can be formed by the personality of the deceased.
  • * Sympathy flowers do not have to be sent straight away. If you are pressed for time and would rather wait until after the funeral is over to send some appropriate flowers to the family home of the person who has passed away, there is nothing wrong with this.

 

Flowers and their meaning

Flowers help commemorate occasions throughout a lifetime including christenings, birthdays, weddings and, perhaps when they are of most significance, funerals. The symbolism surrounding flowers goes back centuries and is often associated with religion and Greek mythology. Although each type of flower tends to have a common representation, flowers for funerals can often be used to express personal meanings.

It is becoming more frequent for people to steer away from the traditional meanings and choose instead flowers that hold special thoughts and memories about the deceased. Alison from Smallridges, a florist located in North Devon, comments: “There is very much a growing trend of flowers representing or symbolising the deceased person’s character or way of life, bright cheerful colours, vibrant, simple/understated or country/wild style flowers and colours.”

We explore the traditional meanings behind the common flowers used for funerals. Whether you are a close relative, friend or colleague of the deceased, it is a good idea to learn about the symbolism of flowers as you may find one that suits perfectly.

LILIES

lisianthus care

The lily remains a popular flower to be used at funerals, for one reason that they are beautiful to look at and are often associated with peace and innocence. Lilies are also used as an anniversary gift, especially on 2nd and 30thanniversaries, making them represent love and devotion for many people.

This flower is rich in history and it is featured throughout Greek myths. The word itself originates from the Greek word “leiron” and is highly associated with Hera, the queen of the gods, in the legends. Lilies also feature in many religious stories as they were used as a symbol of Virgin Mary’s purity. The aesthetic of the lily flower is often described as feminine and majestic. Alison from Smallridges continues: “Commonly used flowers for tributes are still the traditional lily and still white and neutral coloured flowers.”

CARNATIONS

CARNATIONS

The carnation’s name derives from regal origins – alluding either to the Greek crown or the incarnation of God. It’s no surprise, then, that the flowers denote deep affection. The beautiful flower can come in an array of different colours, white carnations are commonly used for funerals as they can symbolise pure love. Red carnations indicate affection and admiration, whereas pink carnations suggest remembrance, which makes all three a fitting choice for funerals.

ORCHIDS

ORCHIDS

Orchids are popular flowers for funerals, not only due to their unique beauty but also because they last for a long period, to express sustained sympathy. The elegant and delicate structure of the flower is a sign of refined tastes and luxury. Orchids are often given to those in mourning, but it is important to consider the colour choice. Phalaenopsis as in the picture and dendrobium orchids are deemed the most appropriate sympathy flowers, with pink and white varieties indicating mourning and eternal love.

ROSES

ROSES

Roses are one of the most loved flowers around the world for all manner of occasions, and each variety has its own special meaning. In the context of a funeral, white roses symbolise purity, humility and innocence, whereas red conveys love and respect and pink signifies thankfulness to the deceased. The yellow rose is often given by friends to denote their deep ties, and the traditional dark crimson rose suggests deep sorrow. A single rose in a bouquet is a particularly poignant way to express enduring love for the deceased. Much like the others, roses are featured in ancient Greek mythology as they are associated with the goddesses of love.

CHRYSANTHEMUM

CHRYSANTHEMUM
These beautiful flowers with intricate petals are, in many countries throughout Europe, are solely viewed as funeral flowers. Their meaning differs around the world– in Asia, they represent grief and rebirth, whereas in America they tend to indicate truth and morality. Chrysanthemums are usually included in funerals as a positive tribute to the life of the deceased. As with many flowers, the colour red symbolises love, while white suggests loyalty and innocence. A yellow chrysanthemum traditionally represents neglected love or sorrow. Overall, the chrysanthemums are often chosen as funeral flowers because of their close association with love and joyful life.

GERBERA

GERBERA
The gerbera is in the daisy family. These flowers are recognised for their beauty and love of sunlight. The flower can come in a wide range of colours which each connote different meanings. For funerals, white, pink and other light-coloured gerberas are used often. The Victorian symbolism of the gerbera flower is strongly associated with a simple and happy life, innocence and gratefulness. Because of their relation to happiness and the way the flower always turns towards the sun, the gerbera is a great flower to celebrate a loved one’s life.
 
Please see our range of Funeral Flowers or contact us for advice on your particular requirements.

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